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July 10th, 2014

We support the novice nurse with extensive orientation and The Essentials of Progressive and Intensive Care program (EPIC).

By Jill Turck

Written by Stephanie Hein R.N. Cardiac Surgery

 

Being a part of the Mayo Clinic team has been very rewarding and challenging.  I have been a Registered Nurse for about a year at Mayo Clinic in Rochester on a Cardiac Surgery Progressive Care Unit.  I would have never thought my transition from a student nurse could have been this successful.  From the beginning, everyone I have been in contact with has been very helpful and inviting.

Mayo Clinic ensures new graduates have a smooth transition and feel comfortable and confident before sending them on their “own.”  I put own in quotations because everything is a team effort at Mayo Clinic.  There is someone to reach out to if I need help or have questions.  Whether it is a new nurse that started around the same time as me or a long-time experienced nurse, everyone is totally committed to their profession and eager to help.  In addition, Mayo has a ton of online resources available if one is ever in a bind.  Teamwork is a value that shines through on my unit and is often discussed by nurses on other units as also being highly valued.

In addition to the extraordinary teamwork that helps ease the transition, one remarkable aspect is the training involved on and off the unit at the beginning of one’s nursing career at Mayo Clinic.  Before being introduced to the unit I would be working on, I went through an orientation program that involved an introduction to the core values, expectations, benefits, and history of Mayo Clinic.  This opened my eyes to what established us as a well-known and profound hospital to work for and be a patient of today.  After that orientation, the orientation on my unit began.  This was exciting and nerve racking at the same time.  I was anxious to finally become a nurse working for an industry that leads by example and puts the needs of the patient first.  Yet having an important role in the team caused me much anxiety.

The orientation on my unit lasted a couple of months because of it being a progressive care unit (PCU).  I was part of a program called EPIC (The Essentials of Progressive and Intensive Care).  This program was about 2 months long.  It brought me back to the basics of each body system and what to expect and watch for with critically ill patients.  In order to pass this part of the class, I had to score at least an 80% on a written exam.  Also, because we continually monitor heart rhythms on our unit, I had to learn how to read EKG strips.  This was quite challenging at first because I was not taught in detail about EKG strips in college.  I thought I was never going to remember all the different rhythms!  I was obviously wrong, due in large part to the nurses and staff members who taught the classes because they were very helpful and willing to put in extra time if needed.  Looking back on the program, I feel as though it was beneficial and important to help me be successful beginning my new career.

Since starting on my unit, I have witnessed an industry that operates effectively and efficiently towards a specific goal for each individual patient.  Mayo Clinic is known for putting the needs of the patient first, but it is even more rewarding to be a member that strives for and witnesses this attribute.  Every day I come to work I am happy to be there.  I am faced with a different challenge each and every day which requires me to critically think which will benefit me as I continue my career as a registered nurse and as I pursue a higher education.  Being an employee of Mayo Clinic thus far has been a blessing.

Tags: Critical Care Nurse, Nurse, Nurse recruitment, Registered Nurse, RN, RN careers, RN jobs, Uncategorized

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